Jan 212019
 

I think its almost irrefutable but the first North East England VMware User Group of 2109 held on the 7th of feb has not only the best line up its had but perhaps one of the best line ups from a regional VMUG ever. My opinion obviously, but just look below.

 

My fellow NEVMUG leader Alan Burns has done a great job describing the agenda here so I’m not going to spell it out for you but having Duncan Epping, Frank Denneman, Rawlinson Rivera, Kev JohnsonKev Johnson, Chris Lewis, Gareth Edwards, Jorge de la CruzJorge de la Cruz and Gijsbert Janssen van Doorn is just amazing!!

I think we have a great mix of community, sponsor, and ‘celebrity’ VMware speakers that wont only give you great opportunity to learn but also give you a chance to get some books signed and some selfies.

PLEASE REGISTER TODAY

I know us VMUG leaders always seem to be promoting and asking for you to register when the reality is you could leave registration to the last min or even just rock up on the day. We love people who just turn up, but, registration really helps us out.

It may seem simple, but all VMUG leadership teams sacrifice time and effort to make these events happen. Including everything from seating, food, drinks, sponsors, session planning etc etc etc needs doing for every event.

By registering you really help us out because it allows us to make sure all the preparations are in place for the right number of people. i.e. if the NEVMUG got more that 120 folks wanting to come we would have to switch venue. Or if we had a low turn out we could use the money we would have spent on food, seating etc on more prizes or for a future event.

So PLEASE register today if you think there is a possibility in you coming along.

I look forward to seeing you there on the 7th.

Post to Twitter

Aug 292018
 

This is the first in a series of posts that will showcase the kind of use cases that are achievable using VCN peering for both the Ravello and OCI platforms.

If you reading this you are likely familiar with Ravello and either us it through something like the vExpert program, are on a trial or are a paying customer.

While Ravello has so awesome flexibility it is missing the odd feature you would expect from a Public Cloud service. For example, file and object storage, database services, private network connectivity to you workloads etc.

Now that Ravello is part of the Oracle portfolio it wouldn’t make sense to build out those services as part of Ravello when they exist in OCI (Oracle Cloud Infrastucre). It makes much more sense to give Ravello access to such services.

Using a capability called VCN peering you are able to link a Ravello application to an OCI VCN (Virtual Cloud Network) allowing for those services in OCI to be available in that Ravello app. I’m not going to show you how to create a VCN peer here but follow the guide here.

oci_peering_diagram_600

OCI File Storage Services:

files

One of the cool things that OCI has is the File Storage Service.  Previously in Ravello if you wanted to present a some file storage you would have needed to create a NAS server in the application itself. Now we can present the file storage through the VCN peering connection. This as the added advantage of not being unique to the Ravello application, which means that a file saved to the file share in Ravello can be available to either other Ravello applications OR to other OCI resources.

To create a File System follow these instructions. After this you will have a private IP which is accessible to Ravello through the VCN peer.

filest.png

And for Ravello this is great, as it means things like backups can be accessed even if the Ravello application is deleted.

The Veeam Lab Architecture:

I have a VMware lab running in Ravello with 4 x vSphere 6.7 host, 1 x VCSA appliance and 1 x Veeam Backup and Replication Server. I have linked my Ravello application to a VCN in an OCI tenancy (this can be any OCI tenancy with a region) using VCN Local Peering, and created a file system in OCI. (this assumes you have already created the VCN network and build your subnets, see the getting started seciton in OCI for help to do this.)

veeam.png

Once you have the initnal setup complete you need to add the NAS as a backup repository in Veeam B&R.

veeam first

When you setup your backup job select the shared folder option.

veeam2

Depending on the options you selected when you create the file share you will see 100GB of storage space.

veeam3

Once you have done the above you can now run the job and have the backup files stored in a enterprise grade and scale public cloud file store.

veeam job running

 

Post to Twitter

Feb 222017
 

We all love free stuff, well I know I do.

Free-Stuff - Copy

If you haven’t heard yet, then im very glad to inform you that the Oracle Ravello Cloud Service is available for another year to vExperts via a 1000 CPU credits per month offer. Ravello is great for vExperts as it provides an online lab where you can run VMware hypervisors among any other type of VM meaning you dont need to buy and run that expensive home lab.

I know there were quite a few worried faces and eyebrows raised when Oracle acquired Ravello and many of you worried for the future of the service. Thankfully this is not the case and Ravello is going from strength to strength and after seeing the latest long term roadmap recently you will be able to do much more with Ravello in the not to distant future.

To sign up please use this link https://www.ravellosystems.com/go/vexpert. If you have signed up to this as a vExpert from previous years you will also need to fill in this form again.

For those new to the Oracle Ravello Cloud Service there is a ton of info on the main Oracle Ravello Cloud Service page and on the Ravello Systems pages.

A good demo for the guys new to Ravello is below.

Post to Twitter

Nov 022015
 

The next North East VMware User Group meeting will be on the 26th of November.

We’re keeping things fresh with a new venue. Campus North is a cool tech based venue and we hope that you like it. http://campusnorth.co.uk/

We have a pretty awesome agenda for you, the highlights are:

  • Zerto are speaking about ensuring IT availability.
  • Lee Dilworth is speaking about SRM across stretched clusters, a subject that im very interested in at the moment.
  • I love community presentations, its what the VMUG is all bout, and we have Nick Evans talking about a real world Zerto deployment by a REAL North East company.
  • Nimble are a NE VMUG favourite sponsor and are back again speaking to us consolidating to their hybrid array.
  • Michael Armstrong is talking NSX. For anyone who knows Michael this will be a great session as there isnt much he doesn’t know about NSX.
  • Andy Ferguson is giving us another community presentation is talking about the benefits of automation in the real world.

We also have a pretty cool set of giveaways.

  • Apple TV Battle
  • UFO Twin Pack Hubsan
  • H107C Nexus 9 Tablet
  • Apple iPad
  • Airtonbus Smart TV
  • Kodi Fitbit flex
  • Wireless VMware VMUG membership with lots of non – production licenses values at over £5000
  • 10 Pluralsight CBT
  • 30 day training passes

Please check out the VMUG page and register as early as you can. It will be great to see you there.

https://www.vmug.com/p/cm/ld/fid=11881&source=5

Post to Twitter

Sep 172015
 

Seems a rather vague question right?

It can depend on any number of variables:

  • Weather
  • Speed
  • Tyre type
  • Tyre condition
  • Age of the driver
  • etc

I know starting a tech blog post off by talking about the stopping distance of a car is odd but I wanted to make a point as this is relates to a question I was asked by a customer recently.

A fairly snr figure in my customer organisation asked me in a public forum “How long does it take to power on a Vblock”. With the benefit of hindsight (isn’t that a wonderful thing), I should not have even entertained trying to answer his question in that forum. But of course I tried, with both parties dissatisfied of the quality of my answer.

As I tend not to give disappointing answers to questions this has troubled me for a few weeks now. Analysing my response over and over didnt seem to resolve my issues with my answer so I have come to the following conclusion

Fundamentally the question was floored!

For example is he referring to how long it takes to boot up the individual components after power outage? Is he referring to getting the base level virtual infrastructure back up (likes of vSphere etc)? Or is he (as i suspect) referring to how long it takes the application to be back to a state where they can run their services?

Each view point has a plethora of facets that need to be factored in to the SLA variables, like below just to mention a few:

  • MTTR – Mean Time To Recovery
  • RTO – Recovery Time Objective
  • RPO – Recovery Point Objective

In a mixed workload environment (which this is) it is common to see different workloads having different SLAs within the same system, and depending on the logical setup around each of those workloads (cluster settings, SRM, Stretched DC clusters etc) each SLA can vary wildly.

Thus, “How long does it take to Power on a Vblock” is not only an impossible question to answer (without a multitude of variables to support the questions) but its fundamentally the wrong question as each application will take differing levels of time to restore fully.

Post to Twitter